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About Raoul    write me    Feeds provide updated website content        

Be part of the fun! Send me your best joke(s) and interesting information. If I like it and if it's new (at least to me), I will publish it, give you credit and add my original drawings to give it that personal touch. Sounds like a deal?

Raoul Pascual: Dangerous Snake

Truth About Reindeer
sent by Francisco of Fullerton, CA

According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, while both male and female reindeers grow antlers in the summer each year, male reindeers drop their antlers at the beginning of winter, usually late November to mid-December. Female reindeers retain their antlers till after they give birth in the spring.

Therefore, according to EVERY historical rendition depicting Santa's reindeer, EVERY single one of them, from Rudolph to Blitzen, had to be a girl.

We should've known! ... ONLY women would be able to drag a fat man in a red, velvet suit all around the world in one night and not get lost.



Aunt Sharon
sent by Naomi of Burbank, CA

A teacher gave her class of 11 year olds an assignment: To get their parent to tell them a story with a moral at the end of it.

The next day the kids came back and one by one began to tell their stories.

Ashley said, "My father's a farmer and we have a lot of egg laying hens.
One time we were taking our eggs to market in a basket on the front seat of the car when we hit a big bump in the road and all the eggs got broken.

"What's the moral of that story?" asked the teacher.
"Don't put all your eggs in one basket!"
"Very good," said the teacher.

Next little Brandon raised his hand and said, "Our family are farmers too. But we raise chickens for the meat market. One day we had a dozen eggs, but when they hatched we only got ten live chicks, and the moral to this story is, 'Don't count your chickens before they're hatched'."

"That was a fine story Brandon."

Michael, do you have a story to share?"

"Yes. My daddy told me this story about my Aunty Sharon. Aunty Sharon was a flight engineer on a plane in the Gulf War and her plane got hit.

She had to bail out over enemy territory and all she had was a bottle of whisky, a machine gun and a machete.

She drank the whiskey on the way down so it wouldn't break and then she landed right in the middle of 100 enemy troops.

She killed seventy of them with the machine gun until she ran out of bullets. Then she killed twenty more with the machete until the blade broke. And then she killed the last ten with her bare hands."

"Good heavens," said the horrified teacher, "what kind of moral did your daddy tell you from that horrible story?"

"Stay the heck away from Aunty Sharon when she's been drinking!"


A Jewish Christmas Story
sent by Naomi of Burbank, CA

The teacher was very curious about how each of her students' celebrated Christmas Eve 'Tell me Patrick, what do you do on Christmas Eve?' she asked.

Patrick addressed the class. 'Well Miss, me and my twelve brothers and sisters go to midnight Mass and we sing hymns, then we come home very late and we put mince pies by the back door and hang up our stockings. Then all excited we go to bed and wait for Santa to come with all our toys.'

'Very nice Patrick, now Patty Brown, what do you do?'

'Well Miss, me and my sister go to Church with Mom and Dad and we sing carols and we get home ever so late. We put cookies and milk by the chimney and we hang up our stockings. We hardly sleep waiting for Santa Claus to bring our presents.'

Remembering there was a Jewish boy in the class and not wanting to leave him out of the discussion, she asked, 'Now Jimmy Cohen, what do you do on Christmas Eve?'

'Well Miss, it's the same old thing every year. Dad comes home from the office. We all pile into the Rolls and drive to his toy factory. When we get inside we look at all the empty shelves and sing 'What a friend we have in Jesus' Then we go to the Bahamas .'

For Austin Deep in the Heart of Austin Texas-

From JRP, Iligan City, Philippines - Hi Raoul! When I was in Austin in 1957 it was a small town. I was even interviewed by a local newspaper & remember telling him our family is in the fishpond business. A Mexican brick layer in the lime plant I observed for a week took me to his houseboat in a lake near Austin & we had steak & beer while we fish. I thought the guy's lifestyle is better than the millionaire I stayed with in Salt Lake city.

For Italian Profiling -

From Pia Hugo, La Crescenta, CA - Hi Raoul! I came here to make reservations for our Sta. Barbara trip and decided to read the Italian jokes because. I have a few from my church. Very funny! Give Mike my thanks! And the illustrations are, as always, very creative! Thanks for the laughs :)


From Dette of Iligan City, Philippines - Always a treat and lift of the spirits whenever I see your cartoons. More power!


From Dette of Iligan City, Philippines - First of all, that cartoon of the lady reindeer and Sta Claus had me laughing loud. You really have imagination, lots. Original too. Congrats. But I really have to thank you for that X'mas story. It touches the heart. May I use the story for my own column in "Mindanao Scoop"? With your name and the "Traveling Boy" properly acknowledged of course. It says below "All Rights Reserved". Does this mean I can't reprint your article even if I acknowledge authorship? Merry Christmas!


From Nina of Quezon City, Philippines - Your Big Bear adventure sure looks cool. Most of my friends in San Diego only go there during winter probably because that's the best place to experience snow in Southern California but I didn't know that summer in Big Bear is a good treat as well.


From Hannah of Monrovia, CA - We've been to Big Bear for several anniversary week-ends and enjoyed kayaking on the lake. But we didn't know the history of the place and we didn't know the owners of the fabulous homes on the lake. Sounds like you had a lot of fun. You make us want to jump in the car and go this weekend.

From J.B. of Virginia - Nice [Big Bear Lake article] ... isn't [the pleasure of taking a vacation] why we are fighting wars, sacrificing, staying up long hours, suffering?.Isn't it for our freedom of self determination ... for our right to live our lives the way we want to and for the ones we care about?

From Tom of Pasadena, CA - Great Big Bear story Raoul. You definitely caught the essence of the place and remind me when my Mom and Dad and 5 brothers and sisters went there to camp in a 14 foot trailer and fish from a 10 foot boat with a 5 horse power Johnson Motor on it.One Summer I caught a 6 pound trout and got my picture in the paper. I was stoked as an 11 year old kid.Many happy memories came flooding back into my cranium regarding the great times enjoyed at Big Bear Lake.Thanks for your sharing them with me.

* * *

So glad you enjoyed the article Tom. Your childhood must have been fun. A 6 pound trout? Wow!! That must have been delicious. --- Raoul

* * *

It was delicious but the fame of catching it was tough to take with all the paparazzi hanging around. Ha! You have a real gift for writing, I thought I was right there with you in that article. --- Tom

From Mike & Trish Marzell of Lucky Bear Fishing Charters, Big Bear Lake, CA - Hi Raoul, You wrote such a wonderful article on summer in Big Bear! Nice website. Thank you for coming out fishing with us - we had so much fun with Josh, you and Dan. We're thinking up good legends and "UFO" is priceless! Please tell us whenever you come up the mountain; we would love to take you and your family out again. You are a great writer (kept us interested). We are going to read your other articles. Thank you again.

Some responses from my Lake Tahoe Adventure

From RV of Covina, CA - I enjoyed reading your Lake Tahoe blog. It brings back memories when I brought my mom & dad to Tahoe in 1999. My dad loved the place so much that when my brother arrived two weeks later, we drove up to Tahoe again. I'm sure you had a wonderful time with Danny, Edwin and their families. Those are golden moments, including the snow chain malfunction, which you won't get tired of re-telling over and over again.

From Hannah of Monrovia, CA - Thanks for your story about the blizzard. It made our day to see how God protected you guys. Otto remembered your bear story--same result; exciting adventure and no one got hurt; but now you have another marvelous God adventure to share!

From Kathleen of Massachusetts- Just read your mini-blog and let me tell you, you guys are very blessed. I won't say, lucky, I'll say blessed. Those slippery ice/snow scenarios are really dangerous. Glad God sent you the snow plow!

We don't get that much snow where we live, but in blizzards, we don't go out. It's too scary. One time we were retrieving our daughter Mercy from Providence, a 25 minute trip in regular weather. It took us 3 hours to get home, driving on the highway in blinding snow. Blinding. We couldn't see a foot in front of us, and if we pulled over there was a chance of getting plowed in to. Never again.

That stuff is pretty, but it's deadly on the highway and for hikers.

From Cindi of Connecticut - A great story and your family has an everlasting memory. There is nothing like home, especially when home is in So CA!

From Terry os Santa Monica, CA - Wow, what a compelling story about snowy Lake Tahoe and the tire chains!

I remember driving my van up to Mammoth to go skiing in my much younger days and having similar episodes with chains. One time a rear chain came loose and wrapped itself completely around the axle. It took two of us, on our backs in the icy slush, in the dark, without wire cutters, hours to untangle that dang chain. It still seems like yesterday. So I empathize with your plight, and glory in your release.

Welcome home.

From Ding of Vancouver, BC- Wow, brave souls, glad you got home safely ;-) Thanks for the TGIF, as always!

From Maria of San Antonio, CA (the email that my article was based on) - Only nuts and daredevils went to Lake Tahoe last weekend. The lat time we went up to the mountains in spite of the blizzard warning, we got snowed in. We just stayed home and watched our own leaks.


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Raoul Pascual Boitano: Big Bear Tips

Raoulisms
(Raoul's mini-blog)

CAROLING

My youngest daughter has been letting my wife and I drive her all over the place because she is part of their school Madrigals who have a string of caroling performances in our area. She's actually quite good. Her husky voice reminds me of Nora Jones.

It reminds me of my college days when I was also a part of a caroling group. But unlike my daughter whose group sings to the rich sponsors and supporters of the school, our caroling group was formed to sing to the poor families in Manila, Philippines ... specifically, a village in a place notoriously known as Smokey Mountain.

SMOKEY MOUNTAIN

Smokey Mountain is one of the most dismall places I've ever been to. It's a mountain of garbage. It got its name from the constant smoke that emanated from the burning dump. Its smell was excruciatingly painful to your nostril --- almost like amonia. Everyday, dump trucks would bring fresh garbage from the city. So what was once flat terrain is now an ever rising mountain of stench. The saddest thing about it is this is HOME to hundreds of poor people who sift through the rancid garbage in hopes of discovering recycle-able materials or even edible food.

When my group arrived, I almost fainted from the smell. I thought I was in a Fellini movie as the sunset silhouetted the activity of children expertly filling their plastic bags with their treasures. Smoke escaped from the embers in the ground like volcano craters.

We were led to the house of the Barangay chief [village leader]. It was a shack constructed with recycled plywood and rusty galvanized roofing material. Our band of "rich college kids" squeezed into the living room the size of a nativity scene.

THE MELANCHOLY HOST

From the outset, our host looked very reluctant. His wife and kids and the neighbors who watched from the open windows watched with curiosity at this rare entertainment.So we sang our carols. And the crowd gave a restrained smile. But the Barangay leader had the saddest expression I had ever seen. As more people came to listen to this live performance, the Barangay chief grew even more worried.

We sang our last number and started to head out the door. And then it happened. The Barangay leader stretched out his hand and slipped a Five Peso bill into the hands of our choral leader.

"What's this?" ourchoir leader asked? Then he realized what was happening. In the Philippines it is customary to give a present (usually money) to carolers who would knock at your door. Pretty much like handing candies to costumed kids during Halloween in America.

"No, sir." our choir leader said, "You got it all wrong. We didn't come here to ask for money. We came here to give. We're here to spread Christmas cheer. We cannot take your money."

For the first time that evening, the Barangay chief cracked a smile which developed into laughter. When he laughed the rest of the family began to laugh. Everyone started to laugh. No wonder he was worried. He didn't have anything to pay for the entertainment. That Five Peso bill was a treasure to him.

The mood immediately changed. Hardened hearts were softened. There was no rich ... no poor ... just brothers and sisters celebrating the joy of Christmas.

TGIF people!

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